Winning the Writing Lottery: Young Writers

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            Passion for the written word is ageless. Unhindered by adult realism, children flourish in their make-believe, fantastical worlds.  Book characters become new best friends and difficult lessons are explored in the safety of loving arms. Blink and those children have morphed into creative teenagers, who want nothing more than to challenge their adult counterparts to acknowledge their ferocious dedication and potential within today’s writing industry.

            The next generation of successful writers is hungrily absorbing information. They read writing blogs between classes and collaborate with friends after school. Most inspiring is the vision of themselves as published authors in the not so distant future.

Like many writers, my own passion for writing sparked at a very young age. I wrote my first of two novelettes at the age of ten. I remember my mother tediously typing my beloved manuscript on a black antique typewriter at our kitchen table. As I look at my early work now, I find the mosaic of black ink and White Out endearing, the floral wallpaper-covers very 80sish and the red duck-taped spine hideous.

Not only were these precious single copy treasures my first exposure to self-publishing, but they’ve also become an inspiration for my own eight-year-old year old daughter who also loves to write. But this marked the end of my writing career until I reached adulthood. While my family and friends applauded my accomplishments, knowledge about teen authors and publishing was largely non-existent in my world.

I’m thrilled that today’s youth have the support and access to resources like never before.  Websites like YouthWritersSociety.com provide a social network for writers, ages 13+, to share their creativeness, ask questions and make connections with mentors and other young writers.  NaNoWriMo YWP, which stands for National Novel Writing Month, Young Writers Program, is an event in November which challenges its youth participants to write a novel in just 30 days.  Young writers’ camps and professional writers’ conferences, like the Castle Rock Writers Conference, that provide writing workshops in a safe and supportive environment with other like-minded people.

Castle Rock Writers has proudly offered a Teen Track program for Young Adults during its writers’ conferences for the past three years. Susan Rocco-McKeel, past Teen Track coordinator for the Castle Rock Writers was delighted with the enthusiasm shown by young writers from all over the Front Range of Colorado.

One such attendee of the 2014 Conference’s youth session was 10th grader Gracie Wilson. Gracie thinks that the most important thing for people to know about her is that she is “just as passionate a writer as some who have been writing their whole lives.” This is a common feeling among most, if not all, youth writers.

Enthusiastic friends, 9th graders Julianne Marsh and Annie Borelli also attended this past year’s writer’s conference. Julianne’s maturity was as clear to me as her writing during a post-conference interview. When I asked her how she finds the time to write, she explained that “it’s difficult, that’s for sure. However, if I tell myself ‘I will write today,’ I can do it. NaNoWriMo and weekends are times where I get a lot done.” Good advice for any aspiring writer.

Annie demonstrated her writing drive in an interview with Jean Jacobsen, 2014 Conference Director. “I really enjoyed visiting each of the classes and hearing the speakers. As far as future workshops, an in-depth explanation of the publication process especially for teen writers would be awesome. I would love to attend another conference!”

Like all writers, no matter their age, teens want to leave their mark on the world. Most read and enjoy writing within the wildly popular Young Adult (YA) genre. It seems reasonable that they would be the experts in this area which can include love, loathing, sacrifice, self-discovery, family contention, and other relationship interactions. Gracie “hope[s] to express in [her] writing something powerful, something that will make people stop and think and wonder and go about their lives in a different way.” Julianne wishes “to create something that others can read and really be drawn into.” She loves that “with writing you can make a world different from your own; there are no limits.” I have no doubt that these three brave young women will accomplish exactly these things in their future writing aspirations.

There are some very impressive gems whose authors astound us with their youthful success. For instance, Christopher Paolini started his journey to the New York Times bestseller list at age 15 when he started writing his novel Eragon. The book’s first edition was published by his parents’ small publishing house, but it wasn’t until his novel was discovered by Alfred A. Knopf  Books for Young Readers that Eragon climbed to the bestseller list, after a reedit and release in 2003. Perhaps even more impressive is Alec Greven from Castle Rock, Colorado, who at age 9 published his first book, with HarperCollins, How to Talk with Girls, after an invitation to the Ellen DeGeneres show in 2008.

Dreams can, and do, come true for young writers.  With encouragement, information and a supportive network of friends and mentors, youth authors can find their way to winning the writing lottery.  They may even one day share their stories with those they love the most, generation after generation to come.

Castle Rock Writers will be hosting free monthly workshops starting January 5th, 2015 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 6:30 – 8:30pm.  First workshop is “Recognizing & Fixing Common Writing Mistakes in Your Own Work.”  Anita Mumm, freelance novel editor will lead an interactive workshop in which she will discuss the most common fiction writing faux pas, with a particular focus on opening pages.

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